Biodiversity

Biodiversity in Bendigo

We are committed to protecting and improving the unique and beautiful natural environment that surrounds the city. We are a city within a forest, incorporating an extensive network of national and regional parks, crown land reserves, public forests and private land. These areas provide habitats for significant plants and animals, and provide us with fresh air, clean water and shade.

However, mining, agriculture and urban development have changed the natural environment - fragmenting and isolating habitat, increasing animal grazing, predators and invasive plants and changing river flows. This has a huge impact on biodiversity - the variety of all living things (plants, animals and micro-organisms and the terrestrial, marine and freshwater ecosystems they live in). As a result of pressures, Greater Bendigo is currently home to 105 threatened plant species, 65 threatened birds, seven threatened mammals, four threatened fish, seven threatened reptiles, two threatened amphibians and two threatened invertebrates.

Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan

The Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan 2023-2033 will establish a shared vision for biodiversity conservation across the region, engaging and supporting actions by the City, land managers and the community to protect, enhance and connect natural values, and advocate on behalf of the environment.

Native vegetation and wildlife

Native vegetation offsets

Native vegetation offset sites provide credits that are required by planning permits to offset the removal of native vegetation. Council owns and manages two native vegetation offset sites, one in Huntly and one in Maiden Gully.

More information about native vegetation offsets is available at the Victorian Government website: Offsets for the removal of native vegetation

Protecting native vegetation

Native vegetation comprises plants that are indigenous to Victoria. It includes trees, shrubs, herbs and grasses.

A list of species native to the Bendigo region is available in the Indigenous Plants of Bendigo guide.

A planning permit is required to remove, destroy or lop native vegetation. More information about current planning permit requirements for removal of native vegetation can be found at the Victorian Government website: Native vegetation removal regulations

Weeds and pest animals

Weeds

Weeds are plants that grow in the wrong place. This can be our natural bushland, creeks or riverbanks, gardens or paddocks. The Invasive Plants and Animals Policy sets out how we manage regional, state and federally listed weeds and pest animals on land owned or managed by the City of Greater Bendigo.

Noxious weeds are listed under the Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994. Landowners are required to control noxious weeds on their land.

Weeds on roadsides

We have a program in place to manage regionally prohibited and regionally controlled weeds on roadsides. Council’s current Roadside Weed and Pest Animal Control Plan sets out our priorities for weed management on roadsides.

Weeds on private land

Weeds are plants that grow in the wrong place. This can be our natural bushland, creeks or riverbanks, gardens or paddocks. The Invasive Plants and Animals Policy sets out how we manage regional, state and federally listed weeds and pest animals on land owned or managed by the City of Greater Bendigo.

Noxious weeds are listed under the Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994. Landowners are required to control noxious weeds on their land.

Roadsides

Roadside vegetation

Roadside vegetation is any vegetation that is growing between the edge of the road and the property boundary. You need to obtain consent to remove vegetation within the road reserve. If the vegetation is native, a planning permit may be required as well.

Firewood collection

You may not collect firewood from any of our roadsides or reserves or from roads managed by VicRoads. There are specific sites around Bendigo where firewood can be collected in spring and autumn. Check dates and locations for the Loddon Mallee region at the Forest Fire Management Victoria website: Firewood collection

Sustainable gardening

Sustainable Gardening

Some useful resources to help you create a sustainable garden include:

Sustainable Gardening Australia Website

Costa’s Guide to Household Composting

Fruit Fly

Populations of Queensland fruit fly have spread across urban Bendigo and a number of small townships. Many residents have experienced damage to their fruit and vegetable crops.

More information:

Agriculture Victoria: Queensland fruit fly

Plant Health Australia: Prevent Fruit Fly

 

Videos

The City and Mount Alexander Shire Council have produced five engaging videos about Queensland fruit fly management for home gardeners:

Pruning

Traps

Garden hygiene

Exclusion

Best practice
 

Disposal of contaminated fruit

Residents that find fruit fly affected fruit on their property should place all the affected fruit in a double lined plastic bag and leave it in the sun for a week to kill larvae.

This bag should then be placed in the general waste bin. It should NOT be put in the organic green waste bin as the composting process does not kill the fruit fly larvae and there remains the risk of spreading fruit fly to other areas.

Conservation reserves

Conservation reserves

Information about City managed conservation reserves is available at our gardens and natural reserves webpage.

Resources:

Macedon Ranges Shire Council: Insects of Central Victoria Guide

North Central CMA: Caring for Country